Training

Creating a ‘Student Risk Manager’ position

April 08, 2011

Cary Primeau
Recreation Coordinator
University of Saskatchewan

As recreation professionals, we all have risk management on our radar – among other duties that our busy jobs entail. Unfortunately, we cannot be all things to all people and often important risk management issues or initiatives fall by the wayside. Rather than lose sight of these important initiatives and day-to-day tasks, effective delegation becomes the key.

Like most Campus Recreation programs, the majority of programming occurs at times when our office is closed, i.e. after the regular office day. Hence at the University of Saskatchewan, a ‘Student Risk Manager’ position has been created which essentially acts as the liaison between what happens in the regular operation of programs, games and other events and the managers of those programs in the office. The Student Risk Manager reports directly to the Facility Manager (who is also the chair of the department’s Risk Management Committee) completing the loop of information-sharing among all programs.

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Risk Management in Action

April 08, 2011

Five Elements for Successful Red Manikin Drill Implementation

Lori K. Miller, Ed.D., J.D.
Sport Law Professor
Sport Management Department
Wichita State University

Shelley C. Rich, M. Ed.
Associate Director of Programs
Aquatics and Risk Management
Wichita State University

Introduction

Recreation literature contains abundant publications addressing risk management and related topics, e.g., risk management plan design, training, implementation, evaluation, and refinement. Similarly, risk management topics often dominate recreational personnel discussions, e.g., meeting agendas, security considerations. However, the actual implementation, staff training, evaluation, and resultant policy modifications often present challenging dilemmas for recreational administrators confronted with risk management responsibilities. This article illustrates an effective risk management practice, i.e., the Red Manikin Drill, that can be adopted and implemented by campus recreation departments desiring to enhance their staff’s response and rescue effectiveness. Five areas important to the Drill’s short- and long-term success are identified below.

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Recent Court Cases

April 07, 2011

Katharine M. Nohr, Esq.
Nohr Sports Risk Management LLC

Below are summaries from court cases across the nation that are hot off the press, decided in August and September of 2007. As always, when reading summaries of court decisions, it is important to note that this is no substitute for reading the entire decision which includes details of the relevant facts, case law and state and federal statutes that are applicable as well as analysis of the court’s decision. Simply because a court decides something in one case does not mean that it will apply to your situation and so it is important to talk to an attorney licensed in your state if you have any questions.

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Recent Changes in CPR, and How they Impact you

April 07, 2011

Jim Fitzsimmons
Associate Director, Campus Recreation and Wellness
University of Nevada, Reno

Over the past two years I have been approached by many professionals in the recreation industry with questions about why CPR changed, who made the decision to change it and what we can expect in the future?
The American Heart Association (AHA) holds the Resuscitation Science Symposium and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Update (ECCU) every year. It is here that the epidemiology and current research is reviewed and recommendations for changes made.

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Training Strategies that (still) Really Work

April 07, 2011

Ryan Lahne
Assistant Director, Facilities and Operations
Washington State University

Editors Note: Not all new ideas are necessarily better ideas. Some student training strategies are timeless — they’ve worked in the past, and they’ll work in the future. The following article describes some ‘tried and tested’ training strategies that have withstood the test of time, and continue to be highly effective training tools.

Emergencies come in all shapes and sizes in the recreation world. For injuries as minor as a cut to cardiac arrest, most college recreation facilities rely on 18-22 year old student staff members as the primary responders for most situations. In addition to handling injuries and medical emergencies, student staff are frequently relied upon to evacuate facilities during fires, determining if a softball game should be called due to lightning, or just dealing with uncertainty that goes with a power outage. Regardless of the type of emergency, training and practice are the most important keys to make sure these young staff members are prepared for all situations. The following describes three simple, inexpensive and proven techniques to better train and prepare staff.

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