Training

Training and Leadership of Sport Club Officers

February 05, 2013

Christopher Schmoldt
Assistant Director, Sport Clubs
Florida State University

Sport Clubs at Florida State University (FSU) are registered student organizations that have been formed for the purpose of competing and or participating in a particular sport. Each club’s level of competition or activity is unique and is dependent on club leadership. Sport Clubs at FSU are student initiated, student-led and student-managed, providing an opportunity for the development of leadership and other transferable skills, and to contribute to the overall college experience.

Florida State has 45 instructional, recreational, and competitive Sport Clubs for the 2012-2013 school years ranging from Lacrosse to Rugby to Bass Fishing. Sport Clubs at FSU are required to travel or host annual seminars in order to remain an active club within Sport Club Program. This helps to differentiate them from the 600 other organizations on campus. So for example, in the case of Martial Arts groups who may not travel as a group to competitions, they will host a seminar each week with an instructor from their discipline to provide demonstrations to students.

FSU employees 6 student club program assistants who are supervised by a full time professional Sport Club Program Director, who in turn is supervised by the Assistant Director of Intramural Sports and Sport Clubs within the Campus Recreation Department. Due to the number, size and diversity or our Sport Clubs, each club is required to have a minimum of three active officers or leaders of their organization who go through training each year. We require a President, Treasurer, and Safety/Travel Officer while also encouraging the use of a Vice-President, and Secretary.
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Webinar on Concussions

September 18, 2012

Bob Liebau
Associate Director of Campus Recreation
University of Mary Washington

A recent article in September issue of Athletic Business entitled MAKING HEADLINES — THE CONCUSSIONS EPIDEMIC RETURNS TO A FAMILIAR THEME: HELMET SAFETY, author Michael Popke points out some recent changes to the game of football based on our new understanding of the seriousness of concussions. Pop Warner Football now bans head-to-head hits. A new high school and college rule requires any player losing his helmet on the field of play to leave the field for one play before returning. And it’s not just football. We are beginning to see more headgear worn by soccer players. More than 20 NFL and NHL have added Kevlar gear to their equipment and at least two dozen pros are using Concussion Reducing Technology (CRT) pads to their helmets.

Why? In the hope that such measures will make sport safer for all participants regardless of the level of play. But despite the best efforts, the reality is that concussions can happen to any person, at any time, in any sport. Are you prepared for that? How are you going to deal with concussions that happen in your Sport Clubs or Intramural programs?

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NIRSA Webinar Training Modules: Fall 2012

May 10, 2012

Problem: Finding time to implement effective risk management training is a major challenge

Solution: Web-based training modules which provide flexibility and high quality training opportunities

Action: Incorporate the NIRSA Webinar Training Modules into your training program!

2012-2013 Highlights

  • 21 Webinar training modules (12 are NEW)
  • Individually priced — you choose only the ones(s) you want!
  • Reasonably priced — most are $50 – $75

Benefits

  • Recorded Webinars are accessible at any time, on any laptop or desktop
  • Year-long access to Webinars allows consistent and ongoing training of full/part-time staff
  • Content is delivered by experts – saving staff time in preparing and delivering training material.

NIRSA Webinar Training Modules:

New
Hazing
Concussions
Level 5 In-service Training
Waivers Simplified
Medical Screening Simplified
Missing Persons Planning
Negligence Awareness for Intramural Staff
Negligence Awareness for Sport Club Officers
Negligence Awareness for Summer Camp Staff
Risk Management Committee
Climbing Wall Supervision
Event Planning Simplified

Updated Webinars
Negligence Simplified
The Nuts & Bolts of Risk Management Planning
Negligence Awareness Training for Part-time Student Staff (tracking option available)
Waivers Advanced
Safety Training for Sport Clubs Officers
Transportation: Planning Essentials
Travel Planning Tools using ‘Google Docs’
Emergency Action Plan — Putting it Together
Emergency Action Plan — Training, Rehearsals & Drills

General Information
Launch Date Mid-August, 2012
All Webinars Accessible at any time, on any computer, for whole academic year
Webinar length Varies: from 20-45 minutes
Target Audience Most Webinars target full-time staff
‘Negligence Awareness’ webinars target student staff and Sport Club Officers

More information coming soon!

Level 5 In-service Training

May 10, 2012

A Comprehensive System for Campus Recreation

Matthew D. Griffith, M.S., RCRSP
Georgia Institute of Technology

The practice of in-service training is critical to keeping your employees prepared to prevent injuries and respond to emergencies. Despite the fact that the importance of on-going training for staff has been almost unanimously agreed upon in some recreation program areas for years (e.g. aquatics), other areas are much further behind when it comes to in-service training. Employee in-service training programs can not only prevent skill erosion and improve emergency preparedness, but also facilitate individual employee development into contributing members of the community. That’s where the concept of Level 5 in-service training comes in. Developed by the author and Dr. Joseph Walker, it addresses observed deficiencies in current practices and maximizes the impact of staff participation. It will enhance the development of the individual and also function as a recruiting tool for future employees.
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Education is the Best Offence!

March 22, 2012

Heather Reynolds
Climbing and Outdoor Rec Program Coordinator
Dalhousie University

It was an overcast early spring day in 1992. My partner and I were on a weekend road trip to White Horse slab and Cathedral Ledge in New Hampshire. We’d just completed two full days of climbing and would be soon loading up the car for the twelve hour drive back home. Despite being ardent sport climbers, focusing on routes no higher than fifty feet, we decided to do an easy long multi-pitch route. This means the route would be multiple rope lengths — in the hundreds of feet. I had some experience with this traditional style of climbing, but my partner had none. Off we went. When we had gone about 3 pitches, it started to rain. When it gets wet, a rock face becomes like a skating rink, particularly in climbing shoes. Eventually we decided going up was no longer a safe option, and rappelling down was the only way to go. Our problem was we only had one rope and each anchor point was almost a full rope length away. We could do it with one rope, but it would mean leaving some gear behind. In the end, that didn’t happen since we were not the only climbers in this predicament. We joined up with another group of climbers and used our ropes together to get all five of us off the wall – wet, but safe and sound.

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A Death at the Front Door

March 22, 2012

Rob Frye
Director, Campus Recreation
Florida International University

I took the call at home about 9:10pm on Thursday, March 25, 2010. It was one of those calls a campus recreation director never wants to receive – there had been a stabbing outside the Recreation Center, campus police were on-site, the suspect was on the loose, and our staff were attending the victim. In the fastest 20 minutes that a normal 30-minute drive could be made, I arrived to find the building surrounded by flashing lights, a crowd of people outside, my staff on lock-down inside, and the beginning of what was to become a long and tragic week for the University.

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