Campus Recreation

Training Strategies that (still) Really Work

April 07, 2011

Ryan Lahne
Assistant Director, Facilities and Operations
Washington State University

Editors Note: Not all new ideas are necessarily better ideas. Some student training strategies are timeless — they’ve worked in the past, and they’ll work in the future. The following article describes some ‘tried and tested’ training strategies that have withstood the test of time, and continue to be highly effective training tools.

Emergencies come in all shapes and sizes in the recreation world. For injuries as minor as a cut to cardiac arrest, most college recreation facilities rely on 18-22 year old student staff members as the primary responders for most situations. In addition to handling injuries and medical emergencies, student staff are frequently relied upon to evacuate facilities during fires, determining if a softball game should be called due to lightning, or just dealing with uncertainty that goes with a power outage. Regardless of the type of emergency, training and practice are the most important keys to make sure these young staff members are prepared for all situations. The following describes three simple, inexpensive and proven techniques to better train and prepare staff.

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Hazing Study

April 07, 2011

Ian McGregor, Ph.D.
President, McGregor & Associates

Hazing/ initiation continues to be a serious problem on many campuses – despite numerous high profile incidents
reported recently. NIRSA recently collaborated on a special project taking place at the University of Maine.
Coordinated by the National Research Institute for College Recreational Sports & Wellness, the study involved 1,789
students answering a 70-question web-based survey. Some of the preliminary findings of Phase I of the study may
(or may not) surprise you:
– 1 in 20 students indicated they had been hazed at their current institution
– hazing was reported across many types of teams and student organizations
– 60% of varsity athletes indicated they engaged in hazing behavior
– students indicated that coaches and advisors are aware of hazing activity.

Perhaps the most significant implication for Sport Clubs was the finding that 22% of
respondents indicated that their coach or advisor actually took part in the hazing ritual.
To learn more about the study, go to the NIRSA website or see www.hazingstudy.com

Developing a ‘Safety Training Grid’

April 07, 2011

Ian McGregor, Ph.D.
President, McGregor & Associates

Training employees in various safety protocols is a critical part of any department’s risk management plan. The challenges are numerous:

  • Significant number of part-time student employees
  • High turnover of employees
  • Significant number of training protocols to cover
  • Consistency of training between program units

Some departments adopt a ‘centralized’ approach to safety training i.e. all ‘essential’ training is coordinated centrally, usually through one person or a training committee (with individual program units responsible for any training specific to their program e.g. aquatics ‘in-service’ training). Other departments require each functional unit to be responsible for their own training (which potentially results in inconsistencies within the department unless someone is monitoring or tracking overall training efforts).

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Supervision and Instruction

April 07, 2011

Ian McGregor, Ph.D.
President, McGregor & Associates

Insufficient supervision and lack of appropriate instruction in sport and recreation are the most frequent types of negligence seen in the courts. Hence it is critical that effective supervision and instructional policies are developed which clearly spell out the requirements and expectations in these two areas.

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Occupiers’ Liability Part II: Licencees

April 06, 2011

Shelley Timms, B.A., LL.B., LL.M.
Timshel Services Inc.
Alcohol Risk Management
Timshel@timshelservices.com

Editors Note: In the US, this is referred to as ‘Premises Liability’.  While there may be differences from state to state, the principles are essentially the same.

Part I of the series discussed invitees, those who are permitted on an occupied land by the occupier, usually for the benefit of the occupier.

The “licencee” is identified as one who, for his or her own purpose or interest, goes onto premises occupied by another with the occupier’s consent or sufferance. It is important to note that consent can be implied as well as express.

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